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The Roundabout Blog

Ghostwriter, Co-Author, or Title Editor?




So you want to write a book, but the thought of putting fingers to keyboard makes you break out in a cold sweat. Before you give up on doing a book project, consider that best-selling novelist, James Patterson, co-authors a dozen books a year; JFK’s Pulitzer Prize winning book, Profiles in Courage, originated from a first draft ghostwritten by his speechwriter, Ted Sorenson; and Anne Frank’s Diary of a Girl was actually stitched into a narrative by her father, Frank Otto using only her journal entries.

Intrigued? You should be. Publishing a book is possible even if you don’t consider yourself a writer. In true Redbrush fashion, we’re here to make it easy for you. If there’s a book idea struggling to be realized, start by answering these questions:

Questions 1; How much do you enjoy writing?

A. I’m not too keen on writing.
B. I enjoy it well enough. It’s okay.
C. I know what I want to say, but just need some help saying it.
D. I’ve organized exactly what I want to say. This is my third draft. It’s getting better with each pass.

Question 2: How much time will you commit to preparation and writing your manuscript?

A. Time? Who’s got time?
B. I only have half the time I need to get a manuscript done.
C. I have two hours this week, two next week, maybe three the week after ...
D. I can manage my time well enough to get this done … eventually.

Question 3: How healthy is your ego? Are you going to be able to get this done and promote this book?

A. It’s a terrific subject matter! It’s going to be a great book! I’ll promote the hell out of it. But TIME? Who’s got the time to write it!
B. I’ll bring the time and experience to do the project. If I could find another person to share the responsibilities with, we’d prove two heads are better than one.
C. There is a hole in my industry where this information is needed, if I could only get it done quickly enough.
D. This is going to be a great book. No one could make each and every piece fit as well as I can myself.

Question 4: What kind of budget do you have to work with?

A. I’ve got plenty of ideas and plenty of cash. What I don’t have is time, patience … or time.
B. Money’s not the issue. But another complimenting set of experiences and ideas might make this book better.
C. I’ll spend what it takes to elevate my content and ideas into a well-written, professional book.
D. I need to watch the budget. I can write this myself. I can spend more on production and marketing services.

Check out your answers against the key below:

If you answered A: Looks like a ghostwriter might be the best choice for you.
If you answered B: Working with a co-author could help you both elevate your individual content.
If you answered C: You’d benefit most from working with a title editor who could help you organize your content and elevate the overall quality of your book.
If you answered D: Go for it. Write it yourself and be ready to consider editing to make sure it reads well and is ready for mainstream audiences.

If you’re ready to begin creating, Redbrush is ready to help you chart the course and gather the resources you’ll need to complete your manuscript’s composition and publish your book. Call Redbrush to hear how easy it is to move your content into a book and your book into the marketplace, to elevate your own brand, credibility, and recognition as an expert in your field.

Redbrush.com helps business people, thought leaders, entrepreneurs, and speakers elevate their content and leverage their expertise into professional, published books.